Change in how poverty is calculated has decreased funding for a Baltimore school

Four years ago, more than 90 percent of students at John Ruhrah Elementary/Middle School were identified as poor. This staggering poverty rate meant the federal government provided the Southeast Baltimore school with free fresh fruits and vegetables for schoolkids. New teachers could qualify for special loan forgiveness, and a bevy of grants were accessible. Perhaps most important, Ruhrah qualified for Title I, a federal program that directs resources to poor schools. Next year, Ruhrah will lose its Title I status and the nearly $250,000 attached to it. (Wash. Post)

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Students at Annapolis High worry about future without robotics funding

In the weeks since County Executive Steuart Pittman released his $1.7 billion budget, students at Annapolis High School are wondering why funding for their robotics team was slashed. The Board of Education’s $40,000 request for high school robotics didn’t make it to Pittman’s proposal, which was revealed May 1. School board members advocated for the funding after hearing testimony from students across the county. Now, students in the Technology Student Association at Annapolis High worry the lack of funding will continue to deter other kids from joining the club — students are asked to pay $25 in dues. Natalie Hardin, 17, said students have complained the club is too “expensive.” (Balt. Sun)

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Businesses and universities team up on a new digital technology credential

Mike Fasil had much to celebrate when he graduated Friday alongside thousands of others from George Mason University. The son of Ethiopian immigrants and the first in his family to go to college, the 21-year-old from Northern Virginia received a bachelor’s degree in information systems and operations management. He minored in an increasingly popular subject, data analysis, and lined up a job as a business technology analyst. (Wash. Post)

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Washington County Public Schools teachers put imaginations on display

Local teachers didn’t hold back their imaginations for the annual Faculty Art Showcase on Sunday at Williamsport High School. Todd Geiman, lead visual-arts teacher at Barbara Ingram School for the Arts, unveiled a massive cardboard sculpture of a human head. It was carefully constructed to create life-like eyes, nose and a wide-open smile. Its bushy head of hair was made from shredded cardboard. (Herald Mail)

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Fresh criticism aimed at Maryland’s higher ed system after report on handling of campus outbreak

Before Maryland’s university system board of regents met in executive session Friday morning, board Chair Linda Gooden issued a statement in direct response to a report from The Washington Post. That story outlined how the University of Maryland waited 18 days before notifying students that there had been an outbreak of adenovirus on campus. In November, 18-year-old freshman Olivia Paregol died after contracting the virus at the school.Gooden’s written statement read, in part: “Along with the entire Board of Regents, I remain deeply saddened by the untimely passing of Olivia.” Gooden’s statement continued, “Let me be clear, student safety is the first order of leadership and the highest priority at all of our campuses.” (WTOP)

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2nd swastika drawing found in Montgomery County middle school

A second pencil drawing of a swastika has been found in a Montgomery County, Maryland, middle school, two days after a swastika was discovered inside a boys’ bathroom on Wednesday. Silver Creek Middle School Principal Traci Townsend sent another letter to parents, saying that another swastika drawing was found in the boys’ bathroom on Friday. She said that building staff has removed the drawing, and the school is working with police and the school system’s Office of School Support and Improvement to investigate both incidents. (WTOP)

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Before stepping down this summer, Naval Academy superintendent looks back at five years

Vice Adm. Walter “Ted” Carter, Naval Academy superintendent, wasn’t a vice admiral, or a superintendent, or really anyone of standing when he arrived at the Naval Academy for the first time. He was Midshipman Carter. A plebe. Legend has it, a skinny kid with big ears. He would leave the academy and graduate TOPGUN before Tom Cruise made graduating TOPGUN part of the cultural lexicon. He would set a record for jet landings on an aircraft, command a strike fighter squadron and start the Navy’s 21st Century Sailor program, focused on mental health and resiliency among enlisted sailors. (Balt. Sun)

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FSU offers athletic training program

Allied health professions are among the fastest growing career paths in the country. In response to that need, Frostburg State University will begin offering a combined Bachelor of Science in exercise and sport science/Master of Science in athletic training, a program that can be completed in just five years. The Maryland Higher Education Commission recently granted approval for FSU to offer the only program of its kind in the state. Frostburg is discontinuing its bachelor’s degree in athletic training and will begin the combined five-year program in the fall. (Times-News)

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