Maryland Colleges, Universities Slated To Get Millions For Maintenance, Economic Development Projects

A number of Maryland colleges and universities could get millions of dollars for capital projects and economic development, Gov. Larry Hogan’s office said Monday. The $34 million in funding comes from bond payments the state got from a July 2020 bond sale. It will become available once the Fiscal Year 2022 budget is passed, officials said. Of the total, $21.2 million is slated for maintenance projects within the University System of Maryland, while another $6.8 million will go to facility renewal projects at 16 community colleges in the state. Morgan State University and St. Mary’s College of Maryland will get $2 million and $1 million, respectively. (WJZ)

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Eastern Shore superintendent files racial discrimination complaint against school board, escalating longstanding tensions

The schools superintendent in Queen Anne’s County has filed a federal complaint against her school board, accusing the five-member body of racial discrimination and opening the door for a federal lawsuit. Dr. Andrea M. Kane, in her fourth year as superintendent in the Eastern Shore county, filed the “charge of discrimination” with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission late last month. (Balt Sun)

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University of Maryland Agrees To Pay Jordan McNair’s Parents $3.5 Million

The University of Maryland has agreed to a $3.5 million settlement with the parents of football player Jordan McNair, who died of heatstroke following a workout in 2018. The amount was made public on Friday in a meeting agenda released by the Maryland Board of Public Works. It must be approved at the board’s meeting on Jan. 27. (WJZ)

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Baltimore educator will use Lowe’s grant to help train students for construction jobs at a new center

When Van Brooks was in high school, he suffered a football injury that left him temporarily paralyzed. He was determined to finish high school and graduate from college. Brooks, who has partial use of all his limbs and relies on a wheelchair, says he realized there were two things that could not be taken away from him — his education and his ability to dream. One dream was to help youth in the Franklin Square community of West Baltimore where he grew up. He also eventually wants to open a school. (Balt Sun)

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If fully funded, FCPS budget will largely address post-COVID needs

Frederick County Public Schools is facing a $34 million variance in its proposed fiscal 2022 budget after the COVID-19 pandemic reduced enrollment in the school system, therefore affecting funding. FCPS saw a decrease of 211 enrolled students for the 2020-2021 school year, equating to a $2.5 million loss of funding at the state level, according to Leslie Pellegrino, chief financial officer for FCPS. (News Post)

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Baltimore County School Staff Members Line Up To Collect Late Paychecks; District Blames USPS For Delays

A group of Baltimore County teachers lined up to get their paychecks Wednesday after a two-week delay school officials blamed on the U.S. Postal Service. First, they dealt with a pandemic and then a ransomware attack hit the county’s public school system. Now, some employees are just glad to have their paychecks in-hand while others said the process has been frustrating as bills come due. (WJZ)

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118 Carroll County Public Schools Staff Members Quarantining For COVID As Of Monday

There are currently 118 Carroll County Public Schools staff members quarantining for COVID-19 since Monday. The school system confirmed that those quarantining either may have COVID-19, may be experiencing COVID-like illness or people who may have come into close contact with either of the two. (WJZ)

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Some parents and teachers are questioning Baltimore’s plan to reopen more schools, classes next month

Baltimore City Public Schools’ plan to allow thousands more elementary and high school students to attend in-person classes beginning next month raised deep concerns from both parents and teachers who question whether schools can be safe places to learn as the pandemic rages. The plan calls for kindergarten through second grade students to return to traditional public school in the city starting Feb. 15. They would be followed March 1 by third through fifth graders, as well as ninth and 12th graders. Nontraditional schools, including charters, can chose whether to open. (Balt Sun)

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