Baltimore Police To Move 70 Specialized Units Members To Patrol, No Officer Layoffs Expected After $22M In Cuts

Baltimore Police Commissioner Michael Harrison spoke exclusively to WJZ Investigator Mike Hellgren Wednesday about the movement to defund police, reforms in the department and his own future. The city council approved $22 million in cuts to BPD last month including slashing the specialized marine and mounted units. (WJZ)

Read Full Article

Appeals court finds judge erred in wiping out $38 million verdict over police shooting of Korryn Gaines

A Baltimore County judge was wrong to overturn a jury verdict awarding $38 million to the family of Korryn Gaines, the 23-year-old Randallstown woman who was shot and killed by county police in 2016, a state appeals court has ruled. In an opinion late Wednesday, judges found the lower court abused its discretion in throwing out the jury’s decision to award Gaines’ family and young son, Kodi, the money. Still, attorneys disagree about whether the 80-page opinion reinstates all or just some of the historic award, the largest ever against a Baltimore-area police force. (Balt Sun)

Read Full Article

Total Cases Nears 68K, Hospitalizations Up Slightly

The number of coronavirus-related hospitalizations in Maryland increased slightly as the total number of cases in the state nears 68,000, data released Wednesday by the state’s health department shows. The latest data shows 461 Marylanders are currently hospitalized due to COVID-19, with 307 of those being acute care cases and 154 people in intensive care. That’s up from 452 hospitalizations on Tuesday and 447 on Monday. (WJZ)

Read Full Article

Confederate statue toppled, monuments defaced in Maryland

A statue of a Confederate soldier that stands in a Maryland cemetery was toppled and two other monuments on its grounds were defaced, according to police. Frederick Police Lt. Andrew Alcorn told the Frederick News Post that officers found the Confederate statue destroyed when responding to Mount Olivet Cemetery on Tuesday morning. The statue had been beheaded and could be seen on the ground splattered in red paint. Cemetery Superintendent Ronald Pearcey told the newspaper it likely won’t be repaired. (Wash Post)

Read Full Article

Montgomery County still holds off on Phase Three, awaits July Fourth impact

Though Montgomery County, Maryland, is seeing a decline in key COVID-19 health metrics, it will hold off entering Phase Three of the reopening plan until officials can be sure there won’t be a spike linked to July Fourth celebrations. Montgomery County Executive Marc Elrich said Wednesday that he was proud of the efforts made in his county and neighboring Prince George’s County and D.C. so far that have kept the area’s numbers declining, even as parts of the U.S. struggle with a surge of new coronavirus cases. (WTOP)

Read Full Article

Eating your catch? Stick with trout, avoid rockfish if you’re fishing Chesapeake Bay watershed

Almost half of all game fish in the Chesapeake Bay’s freshwater lakes, rivers and streams may be unsafe to eat, because of high levels of mercury, according to a recent study by the United States Geological Survey. The most contaminated fish caught and consumed by anglers, and often found on menus, were striped bass or rockfish, followed by walleye, largemouth bass and flathead catfish. Trout seemed to be safest. (WTOP)

Read Full Article

Black female Baltimore Police sergeant settles her harassment lawsuit against the city for $77,000

A Black female Baltimore Police sergeant who claimed in a federal lawsuit that she was unfairly accused of fraternization with a male Hispanic officer will received a $77,000 settlement from the city. The city’s Board of Estimates unanimously voted Wednesday to approve the settlement for Sgt. Jasmin Rowlett who filed a complaint against the city in October in U.S. District Court alleging that the department has “perpetuated a long-standing pattern and practice of discrimination against African American female officers.” (Balt Sun)

Read Full Article

City museums, art groups aim to bring resources to students

A Baltimore-based nonprofit has organized a collaborative effort among the city’s most influential cultural organizations to help students access the arts this summer. Arts Every Day, along with a group of  22 artists and organizations, is hoping to distribute Baltimore Summer Arts Passports to 10,000 students. Participating organizations include the Baltimore Museum of Art, the National Aquarium, the Walters Art Museum, Port Discovery Children’s Museum and the Reginald F. Lewis Museum. (Daily Record)

Read Full Article