Consumers may be able to test for Covid-19 with devices they already own, Hopkins finds

A group of Johns Hopkins researchers are developing a new low-cost Covid-19 testing method, drawing inspiration from a device that millions of people already have in their homes. A research team led by Netz Arroyo, assistant professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences, Jamie Spangler, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, and Taekjip Ha, a professor of biophysics and biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins, is aiming to develop a test for the novel coronavirus that could be distributed quickly and widely across the globe, at a relatively low cost. (Balt Bus Journal)

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University Of Maryland Researchers Team Up With Facebook For Worldwide COVID-19 Survey

In just nine months, more than one million people have died from the coronavirus worldwide. Now, the University of Maryland is teaming up with Facebook to try to get a better understanding of the global impact of the pandemic. People in nearly every country will log on to Facebook and be invited to take a survey put together by University of Maryland researchers. (WJZ-TV)

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Baltimore Mental Health Crisis Hotline Seeing Surge In Calls Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

As the coronavirus pandemic rolls on, it continues to take its toll on mental health, leading to a surge in calls to mental health resources. Elijah McBride, a counselor for Baltimore’s Crisis Response’s Here2Help Hotline, said the hotline is among those seeing a spike in call volume. “Since the pandemic, these calls are starting to be more and more,” McBride said Tuesday. (WJZ-TV)

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Family members of owners, trainers will be able to see Preakness in person

An executive order issued Monday by Gov. Larry Hogan will allow up to 250 family members of participating owners and trainers to attend Saturday's Preakness Stakes. The family members of connections will be the only people allowed to attend the race at Pimlico Race Course. The grandstand and infield will otherwise be closed to spectators. (WBAL)

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Heroes Grove at Howard County General Hospital honors front-line workers amid coronavirus pandemic

A Howard County-based nonprofit organization on Tuesday dedicated 12 Kwanzan cherry trees to create the Blossoms of Hope Heroes Grove at Howard County General Hospital in Columbia. The Heroes Grove, located near the main entrance of the hospital, is dedicated to the caregivers and staff who are working on the front lines and who have sacrificed so much during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a news release from Blossoms of Hope. (Balt Sun)

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‘Music in the building again’: Carroll Arts Center to reopen for live events in October

Carroll County Arts Council Executive Director Judy Morley said art can lift up and inspire people — and potentially alleviate stress brought on by a pandemic. The coronavirus crisis forced the Carroll Arts Center to close in March and a majority of its spring and summer events were either canceled or moved to a virtual format, but the theater underwent major renovations in June to prepare for when guests could safely return for live events. (Carr Co Times)

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Coronavirus In Maryland: 477 New Cases Reported As ICUs Are Down

Maryland reports 477 new coronavirus cases and three deaths, as ICU cases went down Monday morning. Throughout the pandemic, the state has reported a total of 123,880 cases. The statewide positivity rate went from 2.57 percent to 2.58 percent. Hospitalizations are down, now at 315 total hospitalized in the state, with 233 in acute care and 82 in ICUs. (WJZ)

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As coronavirus rolls on in Maryland, mental health toll surges, with experts fearing spike in suicides

The voices on the other end of the Baltimore crisis hotline are desperate. An elderly woman is stuck in her home. Her adult kids are too afraid to expose her to the coronavirus, so they won’t visit her. She is lonely. Her dark thoughts are scaring her. Another caller, a man, is thinking about dying by suicide. He lost his job and says he will soon lose his home. A nurse dials for help. She has seen too many people deteriorate from COVID-19, and she feels swallowed up by depression. The call takers offer support, dispense advice on where to find services and, in emergencies, send immediate help. (Balt Sun)

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