Pitts: Mike Pence was right, inadvertently

Mike Pence was right. At least, inadvertently, he was. In a recent commencement address at Liberty University, the Christian evangelical college in Virginia, the vice president warned graduates that they should expect to be "shunned or ridiculed for defending the teachings of the Bible." "As you go about your daily life," he said, "just be ready because you're going to be asked not just to tolerate things that violate your faith, you're going to be asked to endorse them." (Balt. Sun)

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Schmuck: Despite another strange day at Pimlico, the Preakness delivers a happy ending

For a few scary minutes, it looked like this star-crossed Preakness might end up the way the Triple Crown series began two weeks ago — bathed in controversy and concern for the future of the sport. Hall of Fame jockey John Velazquez was thrown off Bodexpress right at the start of the race and could have suffered serious injury. The horse then galloped riderless around the track like some ominous symbol of what might lie ahead for the Pimlico Race Course and Baltimore’s signature sporting event. (Balt. Sun)

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Allow civilian oversight of Montgomery police

The idea that police are no good at conducting high-stakes investigations of themselves prompted Montgomery County lawmakers to enact a measure requiring that outsiders — meaning law enforcement officers from elsewhere — be enlisted to look into the county’s own police-involved deaths and report the findings publicly. Nice idea. In practice, no outsiders want the job so far. Prompted by the legislation, sponsored by council member Will Jawando (D-At Large), Montgomery officials have been scouring area localities in search of a police department willing to enter into a reciprocal arrangement to investigate each other’s cases when a police officer causes a civilian’s death. (Wash. Post)

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Cal Thomas: My sentimental journey with Doris Day

It was Oscar Levant who uttered the famous line: "I knew Doris Day before she was a virgin." In a way it was a backhanded compliment to a woman who represented in most of her film roles an image of chastity and virtue that was once mostly promoted in American culture, though not always practiced in private lives, including hers. Day, who died last Monday at age 97, became a friend late in her life. (Balt. Sun)

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Parker: Abortion extremism in New York and Virginia paved the way for Alabama and Georgia’s laws

When author Mark Childress penned “Crazy in Alabama,” he wasn’t just whistling Dixie. “I haven’t been quoted this much since Roy Moore,” Childress recently told me, referring to this week’s coverage of Alabama’s passage of a law banning abortion in nearly all circumstances. Moore, of course, was a candidate for Senate from Alabama who lost a 2017 race after accusations surfaced of past inappropriate sexual conduct with underage girls. (Wash. Post)

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Rowland: Baltimore Ceasefire addresses wrong city problem

The criticism of Baltimore restaurant owner Brian McComas for his tweets regarding Ceasefire is misguided and demonstrates a lack of understanding of the problem. The premise upon which Ceasefire appears to operate is that by appealing to potential shooters’ gentler nature, these mostly young men will stop committing violence for a weekend. It is this premise that Mr. McComas is questioning. He is being sarcastic and imprecise but not mean spirited. (Balt. Sun)

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Sachs: A Md. man's chance meeting of Japan's Crown Prince Akihito in 1953

Late last month, Japan’s emperor Akihito abdicated his supreme office because of increasing ill health. Thus ends his 30-year reign on the Chrysanthemum Throne, the world’s oldest continuing monarchy. I had the good fortune to meet Akihito more than 60 years ago at Haverford College at the beginning of my senior year. It was Sept. 15, 1953, and the 19-year old crown prince was in the United States en route home after representing his country at the coronation in Westminster Abbey of Queen Elizabeth II. My job was to welcome Akihito on behalf of Haverford’s student body. It was a perfunctory duty, perfunctorily performed. But for me it was a tiny tug at history’s sleeve. (Balt. Sun)

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Thomas: Why I give to Baltimore's beggars

Inevitably, at any major intersection across the city, a person weaves his or her way among the stopped, temporarily captive vehicles while bearing a tattered cardboard sign reading “Homeless. Please help!” or “Hungry, God bless,” or “Thanks for caring.” Tattered clothes and shoes, and, occasionally, a dog, complete the image of neediness. According to Etymonline, we call such a person a panhandler based on the “notion of arm stuck out like a panhandle” (ca. 1849). Easier to cast a person as an object than to see a real-life arm of flesh and blood connected to a torso, a neck, a face looking surprisingly like my own. So I’m going to use person-first language and call panhandlers people who are beggars. (Balt. Sun)

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