Goldberg: Maybe liberty isn’t a lost cause in China

Here's a crazy idea: Maybe the forces of liberty will win. Sadly, few people are rooting for liberty these days, and even among those who are, there's a dismaying amount of pessimism about its prospects.,Consider China. There's a new bipartisan consensus these days: The "elites" made a "bad bet" on China. We were told by “elites” that giving China access to the global marketplace would deliver huge economic benefits for America. Simultaneously, economic liberalization in China would lead to political liberalization. After all, the history of democratization usually begins with growing prosperity. As the middle class gets richer, it demands rights and protections once enjoyed only by aristocrats — i.e. political representation and the rule of law. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article 

Editorial: Transportation spending bill gets a modest White House boost; it needs a much bigger one

Amid all the corrosive hate and heart-tugging tragedy of the last two weeks, President Donald Trump’s Twitter account actually produced at least one constructive idea with broad appeal that deserves more attention. Perhaps exhausted from his Baltimore bashing and assault on House Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings, the president on July 30 signaled his support for a $287 billion highway spending bill now pending in the U.S. Senate. Most amazingly, the bipartisan legislation actually recognizes climate change and promotes infrastructure to accommodate electric, hydrogen and natural gas vehicles. That alone makes Mr. Trump’s support notable. (Balt. Sun) 

Read Full Article

Adams: Developmental education critical for underprepared students

A few years ago, I was teaching a traditional “developmental” writing class of 20 students at Community College of Baltimore County; the goal for such classes is to help underprepared students catch up to their peers through research-supported education. Two students in my class were suffering from PTSD, one had epileptic seizures several times during the semester, one had a brother killed just a month into the semester, and 16 worked at least 30 hours a week. Four of my students had graduated from high school without ever having read a complete book or written an essay. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Editorial: Are drug dealers killers? It all depends.

Attorney General Brian Frosh has put the word out to local prosecutors: Drug dealers should be held responsible when they supply the drugs that kill people. He wants to see more charges for manslaughter in such situations now that there is the legal backing of Maryland’s highest court, which recently upheld the conviction of a Worcester County man who sold a potent strain of heroin to someone who overdosed. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Editorial: As Hogan digs in his heels against Kirwan school funding, the Maryland legislature needs to lead

Gov. Larry Hogan used his annual address to local officials at the Maryland Association of Counties meeting this weekend to complain about the cost of the proposed reforms of the Maryland Commission on Innovation and Excellence, better known as the Kirwan Commission, and to vow that he would stand in the way of any major tax increases to fund them. That’s nothing new; he’s been doing it ever since the group first started tallying up what it would cost to make Maryland’s educational system truly competitive on an international level. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Kelly: Scooters, bikes and mopeds aren’t enough. We want dockless everything!

Looking back, it seems funny that everybody thought the dockless electric mopeds would be the straw that broke the app-based, vehicle-sharing camel’s back, coming as they did after the dockless scooters, dockless bikes and the car-share cars: the Zipcars and the Car2Gos. (Cars2Go?) Surely, people thought, the streets of Washington could take no more. But the marketplace abhors a vacuum and only a few weeks after the rental mopeds debuted, they were joined by the dockless steamrollers, courtesy of a macromobility start-up called Flat.  “We want to revolutionize the world of steamroller rental,” said Devin Willow, Flat’s CEO — compression envisioning officer. “Is there a huge demand for steamrollers? (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Editorial: Here comes the solar

Frederick County is beginning to realize the benefits of its project to build solar power arrays on vacant land at the county landfill, and we are excited at the glimpse of the future being offered here. The solar array, which was dedicated this month, was built on just 14 acres at the landfill, but it can generate almost 2 megawatts of power a day. That will supply nearly 20 percent of the county’s general building power needs. Such well-known county buildings as Winchester Hall and the C. Burr Artz Public Library will now get clean power from the sun. So will the libraries in Urbana and Emmitsburg and the Frederick Senior Center. (News-Post)

Hsu: Immigrants are key to Baltimore’s economic growth

Baltimore is booming, and training a digital workforce is key to cementing our position as a national innovation hub. Unlocking our city’s full potential depends, however, on our ability to welcome immigrants and leverage their entrepreneurial zeal to power our economic growth. I should know: I’m a Taiwanese immigrant, and my company, Catalyte, is training Baltimore’s workers as software engineers. We use artificial intelligence to identify people — from school teachers to construction workers to PhDs in biology — with the potential to become great developers. We’ve shown that given proper training, both new arrivals and multi-generational Baltimoreans can achieve amazing things, and compete on equal terms with computer-science graduates from top universities. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article