FCC a fine beginning

In May 2010 I spent a couple of hours at school practicing for my high school graduation ceremony. While sitting quietly waiting for practice to start, two of my classmates nearby began talking about their plans for college. Both were attending public universities and talked about all the so-called failures who had to attend community college because they couldn’t get into a university. After I graduated from high school I began my college career at Frederick Community College, but not because I couldn’t get accepted into a university. (News-Post)

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Gansler's remarks reach unintended audience

After the infamous May 2012 “47 percent” speech that helped cripple Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign, you’d think that candidates would be more careful about what they say — even when they’re preaching to the choir behind closed doors, as Romney was. Fast forward to July 15 of this year, when Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler Jr., an unofficial candidate for the Democratic nomination for governor, was speaking to a group of campaign workers. (News-Post)

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Petitioning change

In her Aug. 3 story headlined “Signing up for change,” News-Post reporter Bethany Rodgers took a look at online petitions and if/how they affect local government. The answer seems to be little, if at all. But for average citizens, petitions can be a means to express their displeasure with local government and its decisions, and the simple act of doing so can be rewarding. While the effort may not succeed, there is value in it for those who participate. (News-Post)

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Report has good news about Anne Arundel Co. police

It could have been much worse. That thought, perhaps accompanied by a sigh of relief, is the likeliest initial reaction to an 10-page report compiled by a panel of outside police officials asked by County Executive Laura Neuman to assess the Anne Arundel County Police Department. The task force drew up 10 recommendations, one of which — the selection of a new permanent chief from outside the department — is already a reality. Most of the others are sound ideas. (Capital)

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Compromise

Mayor Josh Cohen may be joshing us when he says there are three options for the council to consider regarding the old Acme (also called Fawcett) property. A fourth option is to tear down the building and install a park. Said park could accommodate autos as well as benches and trees. This is a sensible options since any large structure on the property would most likely undermine the fragile fill (garbage from the old fish house that worked there before there was a Compromise Street). (Capital)

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Catherine Pugh: The false promise of municipal broadband

For many local governments, the promise is seductive. A cottage industry of consultants and network builders — who stand to profit handsomely — sell the idea to misty-eyed government officials that building a municipal broadband network will spawn a local Silicon Valley microcosm that will be a monument to their incumbency. But what they don't see is that the economics of the grand venture doom it to likely failure. (Balt. Sun)

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August 7 // Jump start for the Purple Line

For the time being, Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) can bask in headlines about the light rail Purple Line, which he jump-started Monday by announcing Maryland would add $400 million in state funding and seek a private partner to build and run the project, which would connect Montgomery and Prince George’s counties. He can leave it to another day to worry about financing the rest of the $2.2 billion construction, which still looks iffy. (Wash. Post)

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Steven Platt: Leadership needed from Annapolis to D.C.

As we quickly approach the city elections, with congressional elections in a year and the next presidential election on the minds of the political class, we ought to pause to reflect on how to select the best leaders for every branch of government at every level. Unfortunately, if we attempt to seriously address the difficult issues that divide our country, state, and even our counties and city, we have to conduct that effort in an atmosphere that is charged with hyper-partisanship, which is at best not helpful and at worst destructive. (Capital)

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