Franchot & Locklair: Tax-free week is coming up and retailers need your help

By the time August rolls around, many of us are trying to savor the last days of summer and prepare for the coming school year. This year, of course, the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the rhythms of our lives, forcing us to adapt to a new routine. But in a world of uncertainty, one thing that remains the same is the occurrence of Shop Maryland Tax-Free Week. (Balt Sun)

Read Full Article



Editorial: Surprised by Rep. Yoho’s verbal abuse? Maybe you should ask yourself why

The vile language Rep. Ted Yoho of Florida recently used to describe fellow Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is unfortunately no anomaly in a society where misogyny is still very much alive. The abusive words, in which Representative Yoho called his colleague a ‘”f------ b----”, was only unique in its publicity and the high profile of those involved. Representative Yoho, a Republican, has denied that particular name calling, but a reporter with The Hill said he heard it and the congressman admitted to other rude comments during the confrontation. (Balt Sun)

Read Full Article

Safe at home is a good call for students

With the pandemic monster stirring once again in Maryland, the Frederick County school board made the only safe choice available to it by deciding to reopen this fall with remote instruction for almost all children. Everyone wants the schools to fully reopen and have all the children back working with their teachers in the classroom. It is best for the children, who learn more in a classroom. It is best for teachers, most of whom love to work directly with children. It is best for parents, most of whom depend on schools to take care of their children while they work. (News-Post)

Read Full Article

EDITORIAL: By threatening unemployment benefits, Republicans risk sending the economy over a cliff

The 31.8 million U.S. workers currently receiving unemployment insurance benefits need that help — and they need clarity about how much help they are going to get, and for how much longer. Too bad neither the Republican majority in the Senate nor the White House can get its act together to meet those needs, especially with a July 31 expiration date for a covid-19-related $600-per-week supplement fast approaching. (Wash Post)

Read Full Article

Gaskins: State Still Keeping Minorities Out of the Medical Cannabis Business

On Thursday, the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission’s Policy Committee will consider changing its regulations to allow a licensed cannabis cultivator to open a second cultivation facility — while minority-owned companies are left shut-out, as they have been for the last five years. This change must be rejected. It undermines the legislation, which allows a licensee to operate from one location and accommodates their move to another location. (Md Matters)

Read Full Article

EDITORIAL: Election judges in critically short supply: Return to mail-in voting

If Gov. Larry Hogan can tear himself away from the weighty duties of promoting his newly-released autobiography this week, he might want to take note of what’s happening in Howard County where poll workers are in a short supply reminiscent of the supermarket bathroom tissue aisle in the early days of the pandemic. To suggest matters have grown desperate only understates the case. (Balt Sun)

Read Full Article

Will: Biden’s election will end national nightmare 2.0

Moments after becoming president on Aug. 9, 1974, Gerald Ford said, “Our long national nightmare is over.” Having served a quarter-century in Congress, he understood that presidents are to “take care” that laws produced by the first branch of government are “faithfully executed.” The nation in 1974 was eager for a collegial respite from the gladiatorial strife that had consumed the country during urban disorders and the Watergate stew of scandals. (Wash Post)

Read Full Article

EDITORIAL: Older poll workers are afraid to work this fall. Younger Americans should step up.

With fewer than 100 days until the November election, officials are scrambling to figure out how to safely conduct an election during a public health crisis. At this point, several key issues are largely the province of government officials, such as ensuring that ballots are sent to voters in a timely manner and implementing hygiene protocols at polling locations. But ordinary Americans can address a major issue: a shortage of poll workers. (Wash Post)

Read Full Article