The Technology 202: Facebook under fire after ads identifying whistleblower spread on its platform

Facebook is confronting criticism after the spread of ads on its platform that included the alleged name of the whistleblower at the center of the House impeachment inquiry. The company took down ads by several conservative groups who responded to President Trump's calls to unmask the whistleblower by using Facebook's ad tools to boost posts with the official's alleged identity, according to The Post's Isaac Stanley-Becker and Craig Timberg. “Any mention of the potential whistleblower’s name violates our coordinating harm policy, which prohibits content ‘outing of witness, informant or activist,'" Facebook spokesman Andy Stone told my colleagues. (Wash. Bus. Journal)

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WMHS earns sixth straight cardiac surgery recognition

Western Maryland Health System is among the top 10% in the nation for cardiac surgery and the only hospital in Maryland to achieve the Cardiac Surgery Specialty Excellence Award for six years in a row (2015-2020). That is according to a national report by Healthgrades, the leading online resource for comprehensive information about physicians and hospitals. Every year, Healthgrades evaluates performance at nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide for 32 of the most common inpatient procedures and conditions using Medicare data and all-payer data from 15 states for bariatrics and appendectomy procedures. (Times-News)

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5G wireless is coming — and the battle has already begun over where to allow the antennas in Maryland

Modern technology is facing an old problem as local governments wrestle with where to allow cell phone carriers to place new antennas that promise improved service and the next generation of smart technology. Baltimore’s streets are dotted with more than 600 “small cell wireless facilities” on streetlights and utility poles, making the city one of the first areas in Maryland to welcome the new technology. (Balt. Sun)

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Johns Hopkins Hospital plans $400M renovation, addition

Johns Hopkins Hospital is planning a $400 million addition and renovation of the Children's Medical and Surgical Center on its East Baltimore campus to accommodate more laboratory and research space. The project will involve renovating the building — now two-thirds vacant and no longer housing pediatric patients — as well as building a new tower on the site of the former Brady Building, which was demolished earlier this year. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Downtown Redevelopment Site Plan Extension Sparks Debate

A seemingly innocuous request to approve a site plan extension for the redevelopment of a corner lot in the heart of the resort’s downtown area this week led to a broader discussion on when the statute of limitations should run out for such requests. The Ocean City Planning Commission on Tuesday had before them a request to extend the site plan approval for the proposed redevelopment of a property on the northwest corner of Dorchester Street and Philadelphia Avenue. (Dispatch)

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Young expects Baltimore businesses to back youth initiatives

Baltimore Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young said he is optimistic businesses will support initiatives to divert city youth from crime and controversial activities that business leaders say contribute to safety concerns downtown. Roughly a month after meeting with principals of some of the city’s most prominent enterprises, Young said Wednesday that the city has not secured a set dollar amount to fund youth initiatives, including his plan to prevent problems with the so-called squeegee kids. (Daily Record)

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Employment still lags for workers with disabilities

They make up the largest minority group in the country, but adults with disabilities are struggling to find employment. Employers rarely include adults with disabilities in their corporate diversity plans and the results are clear: Less than a third of adults with disabilities below retirement age are employed in the U.S.  Despite statistics that show employees with disabilities perform well, there is a disconnect when it comes to hiring. And it’s one that several local nonprofits are working to change. (Wash. Bus.)

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Later Metro service hours, fare evasion come under budget microscope

Metro General Manager Paul J. Wiedefeld’s budget proposal to fulfill a rider wish list that includes later hours, a flat weekend fare and more frequent weekend service will come at more than a financial cost: more service disruptions such as temporary station shutdowns and single-tracking for maintenance. That is one of the many considerations Metro board members must weigh as they review Wiedefeld’s proposed spending plan for the fiscal year that begins July 1. (Wash. Post)

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